CHRIPS

CHRIPS
KAMPALA, 2017
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The team consisted of two CHRIPS representatives Joash and Gabriel, they were matched with a creative team headed up by DATA4CHANGE alumni Max. Their team consisted of Sabah (graphic designer from Egypt), Clement (developer from Kenya), Joy (data researcher from Uganda), Bob (journalist from Kenya), and Patrick (data journalist from Uganda).

The team consisted of two CHRIPS representatives Joash and Gabriel, they were matched with a creative team headed up by DATA4CHANGE alumni Max. Their team consisted of Sabah (graphic designer from Egypt), Clement (developer from Kenya), Joy (data researcher from Uganda), Bob (journalist from Kenya), and Patrick (data journalist from Uganda).

Gender based and sexual violence is prevalent in parts of Kenya. CHRIPS has been collecting data on this topic in and around the Nakuru County, which is situated north west of Nairobi. The county has a booming city centre but is surrounded by slums where violence against women is part of everyday life.

 

THE DATA

CHRIPS’s data was a household survey of people's experience and opinions of violence in Nakuru County in 2017.The study was carried out in three low-income local informal settlements (slums) and their dataset consisted of 1780 individual interviews.

Questions included whether they had been a victim of crime, if anybody came to their rescue, and whether they reported i  and to whom, as well as demographic information. They were also asked what they believed could be done to reduce violence. CHRIPS originally collected this data for their own internal understanding of the issue before realising it could be used to form the basis of a campaign.

In addition to the dataset CHRIPS also had testimonials from local residents and victims of crimes, as well as access to public open datasets covering crime and gender based and sexual violence in other parts of Kenya.

OBJECTIVES

CHRIPS is a research organisation and had up until this point not done much advocacy work. At the DATA4CHANGE workshop they wanted to explore ways that they could use the data they collect and make it more public facing and engaging to the communities that it works with.

RESULT

At the workshop the team generated a number of concepts. In the end CHRIPS decided on a narrative project peppered with strong visuals that would work in print as well as online.

The final and launched  campaign is called “More than Numbers” and it is a campaign against gender based violence (GBV) and sexual violence in Kenya. The campaign is a multi-platform campaign, meaning it has a mobile friendly website, a pamphlet and poster series used for offline campaigning in English and Swahili, t-shirts and wristbands for the outreach workers, videos, a digital petition on change.com and a paper petition for offline campaigning, a Facebook account etc.

To ensure they could increase the reach of the campaign CHRIPS teamed up with two other NGOs,  Youth to End SGBV and GBV Prevention Network. They are also working with local charities to help spread the word about the campaign.

The campaign highlights individual stories and experiences of sexual violence suffered at the hands of strangers, loved one and even police officers. Most women who are victims of gender based violence do not seek medical assistance or report their plight to the police.

The core of the campaign is a website which uses colorful graphics to show the proportions of victims from the survey of 1780 interviewees interwoven with personal stories using photos and videos as well as journalistic style copy.

The data exploration phase of the dataset at DATA4CHANGE found that GBV and sexual violence was reported and dealt with more thoroughly by police in an area where specially trained female police officers were working on the GBV desk.  

As a result the final aim of the campaign is to get more specially trained female police officers stationed at every gender desk at every local police station. In this effort, CHRIPS have set up a change.org petition for visitors to the website to show their support in convincing the Nakuru county government and Nakuru County Police Coordinator to establish gender desks in all local police stations.

They are also doing paper-based petitions which they are collecting signatures for in their outreach work. They presented the petitions to the local authorities and the police in May 2018 with and hope that they can influence public policy as a result of the strong community support for gender desk police officers.

Bronwen Robertsonk-17